New York Off-Duty Cop Kills Unarmed Man In July 4th Road Rage Incident

Details are still emerging in the July 4th fatal shooting of an unarmed convicted felon by an off-duty New York City police officer during a road rage incident shortly after midnight.

Reports are that, as the two men were at a red light, 37 year-old Delrawn Small, who was driving with his girlfriend, Zaquanna Albert, 35-years-old, and her two kids to a fireworks show, got out of his car and approached a car driven by off-duty Officer Wayne Isaacs, who had just finished working a shift, but was not in uniform.

A witness reported that Isaacs’ car had cut off Small’s car as they approached the traffic signal. When Small got to Isaacs’ car, he allegedly punched Isaacs twice in the face. Isaacs responded by firing a gun as many as three times, fatally shooting Smalls.

The New York Post reports that Small, a father of three, had been drinking at a barbecue earlier in the night, and has a criminal record with around two dozen arrests, which include armed robbery and drugs.

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Delrawn Small (family photo)

Some reports say Isaacs did not exit his car, but one report quoted a witness, Lloyd Banks. a 43-years-old construction worker, as saying, “Delrawn and the cop’s car almost hit each other. And Delrawn got out of the car and the cop just jumped out and started screaming. He just shot (Small) right there on the street.”

Police have classified the case as a road rage incident, but have not released any available surveillance video, and have not stated whether or not the shooting was justified. Isaacs has been placed on administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation by the state’s Attorney General’s office.

Small’s family is enraged, threatening to “hunt him [Isaacs] down”. His niece, Zoe Dempsey, 23-years-old told the New York Post, “We will seek our justice’’ — and get violent if necessary. “This is war, she said, “I’m from Brooklyn. This is our neighborhood.”

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Delrawn Small

Dempsey said she and her friends “are hunting [Isaacs] down’’ if justice doesn’t prevail. “So if I’m going to find him, he’s going to get what he deserves . . . If this hits trial and I have to pull up with my homies and we beat his ass, then I’m with that, too,’’ she said.

Small’s family has also set up a GoFundMe page to raise funds for his funeral.

The city of New York recently settled a lawsuit involving a racially charged false arrest case with Isaacs as one of two officers accused, in which the plaintiff  was “punched, kicked and struck several times in the head and body,” and also called a “n—-r”.

NBA Player Bryce Dejean-Jones Killed After Breaking Into Dallas Apartment

Bryce Dejean-Jones of the New Orleans Pelicans’ NBA team was shot and killed after an early morning break-in on Saturday, May 28, at a Dallas apartment he believed to be his girlfriend’s, when he startled a man he didn’t know, the Dallas Morning News reports. Under Texas self-defense laws the shooter likely won’t face any charges.

Dejean-Jones, a 23-year-old 6′ 6″ guard for the Pelicans, reportedly kicked open the front door of the unit in the Dallas apartment building, awakening a man who grabbed a handgun,“called out”, then fired when he got no answer and Dejean-Jones kicked the door to a bedroom. Dejean-Jones died later at a local hospital.

Although Dejean-Jones was not armed, the shooter would be justified, and likely won’t face any charges, this should not be considered a “stand your ground” case.

Texas self-defense laws provide immunity from liability for a personal injury or death resulting from the use of deadly force to a defendant who is found to be justified.

Bryce Dejean-Jones
Bryce Dejean-Jones

Just like virtually every other state, Texas uses Castle Doctrine as a basis, defined such that a person is allowed to use deadly force to defend himself inside his home, if “immediately necessary”. The person using deadly force must know or have reason to believe that the person against whom the force or deadly force was used unlawfully and with force entered, or attempted to enter the person’s home.

The stand your ground portion of the law allows deadly use of force with no duty to retreat outside the home, such as in a vehicle, or place of business or employment; or anywhere a person has a legal right to be.

In either case, the person using deadly force cannot be committing or attempting to commit certain serious crimes; cannot have provoked the person against whom the force or deadly force is used; and cannot be engaged in criminal activity. Texas law does not state that the person must feel threatened or in  fear for their life.

DeJean-Jones attended the University of Southern California and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, then transferred to Iowa State. He joined the Pelicans as a free-agent rookie last year for his only NBA season (which ended early because of a broken right wrist), starting 11 of 14 games and averaging 5.6 points with 3.4 rebounds. He had recently signed a three-year, $2 million deal with the team. Read the full story at Dallas Morning News.

 

What The Zimmerman Gun Auction Means

 

By now, you’ve probably heard that George Zimmerman placed an online auction on the gun he used to fatally shoot Trayvon Martin. He said the U.S. Department of Justice returned the gun to him, after holding it since his acquittal on July 13, 2012.

When many of us saw the name of America’s human disaster trending on twitter last week, we were hoping he had died, right? This latest fiasco by a sick, troubled, publicity hounding, murdering nut who claims to be so “patriotic” means some disturbing, haunting emotions and memories America experienced three years ago will return.

Gun used to kill Trayvon Martin
Gun used to fatally shoot Trayvon Martin

My first reaction was not to publicly post or comment on this. To just let it ride, while America’s reactions played out on major news outlets, and give it time to blow over. Then my own emotions took control, and the anger, disgust, and pain seeped into the fingers typing these words. As I waited to observe the original online auction, it mysteriously disappeared right about the time it was scheduled to begin.

The Orlando Sentinel reported that GZ later sent a text which read that the auction site “was not prepared for the traffic and publicity surrounding the auction of my firearm.” That site later issued a statement saying it reserves the right to reject listings, and had done so with this one.

So he cut and pasted the gun and description onto another site, unitedgungroup.com, with the same starting bid of $5000. The site publicly changed their position regarding the auction, at first denying, then allowing the sale (presumably at the advice of their legal counsel), conceding he had as much right to sell his weapon on their site as anyone else did.

The description says that sale proceeds will be used to “fight BLM violence against Law Enforcement officers, ensure the demise of Angela Correy’s (sic) persecution career and Hillary Clinton’s anti-firearm rhetoric.” It ends with the Latin words Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum (If you want peace prepare for war).” –

If there was any good intention in this creep, he would have donated the gun to a museum, or had it destroyed. Instead, he claims in the sale description that he turned down a Smithsonian offer, but the museum has issued the following statement on twitter:

This new auctioneer site reportedly crashed as the second auction began, but was back up the next morning. The auction was scheduled to run 4 more days. But after it was targeted by fake bidders, and reached a high bid of $65.4 million USD, that user’s account was deleted.

Then a new bidder posted a high bid of $485,000. The disturbed gun owner soon deleted the first auction himself, vowing to start over days later, and did so yesterday (May 17), with a starting bid of $100,000.

Zimmerman gun auction screen shot
Zimmerman gun auction screen shot from unitedgungroup.com (click to enlarge)

This time, only about three or four serious bidders and a couple of fake ones participated. In the end, it appeared the gun had sold to someone named David Thorne for $138,800 – although a hacker named John Smith (with a widely reported fake last-minute bid of $138,900) made several attempts to derail the sale with fake bids.

The auction was immediately deleted from the site after it ended. If all auction attempts failed, GZ reportedly claimed he still had several private offers.

The freedom to sell anything he owns would also apply to the vehicle he drove on the night he fired the fatal shot on Trayvon Martin, or the clothes he wore that night.  Yet, for anyone to attempt to profit from a tragedy that shook the nation is as callous and unpatriotic as trying to sell hurricane memorabilia to storm survivors.

How sad. How utterly insulting, disgraceful, disrespectful, distasteful, atrocious, ignorant, shameless, selfish, and blatantly obnoxious. We could go on and on with adjectives that deliberately cut open wounds that haven’t healed, to describe how this feels, and what it means.

One thing that should never happen is that a murder weapon in a case like this can be used against the emotions of America. It’s an ultimate insult to the victim’s family – and all those who protested the outcome of one of the most famous trials in our history.

The reality of what the auction means is all too painful. It’s the ultimate slap in the face to everyone who thought it was a disgraceful injustice when a man who fatally shot an unarmed teenager walked free.

UPDATE: This article has been edited as originally published to include facts established by auction observation such as a widely reported last-minute bid of $138,900, which was established to be a fake bid.

Alleged Gang Member Kills Vigilante Councilman, Claims Stand Your Ground

A jury today could not reach a verdict, resulting in a mistrial for an alleged South Carolina gang member who claimed stand your ground in the murder of 17-year Chester City Council veteran Odell Williams. The stand your ground motion was denied on Monday (April 18).

19-year-old Christopher Moore said he felt threatened, feared for his life, and in self-defense fired up to 18 shots from a rifle that killed Williams on November 4, 2014.

Moore is one of five men – along with Terrance Buchanan, Derrick Dixon, Quinton McClinton, and DeAngelo Roseboro – all with felony records – involved with gunning down 79 year-old council member Williams after the politician-church deacon-football and baseball coach followed them.

After all the men were arrested, Chester County Sheriff Alex Underwood said police had received death threats from gang members, and declared a “war on gangs in Chester” .

Why Williams followed the men, and why he didn’t call police, is unknown, but guns create an environment of empowerment. Each side is entitled to their 2nd Amendment right to defend himself.

Odell Williams
Odell Williams

In October 2014, near Williams’ home and concrete business, a house belonging to a rival gang had been hit with gunfire. On Nov. 4, the five suspects were in a truck parked near the business “with the intention of committing armed robbery” against the “rival gang house,” 6th Circuit assistant solicitor Julie Hall said.

Moore testified that he and his boys had been smoking marijuana and scheming on the rival gang because of a drug deal gone bad. Williams’ wife saw the suspects parked in the truck near the business and called him.

Odell Williams, painted by defense attorneys as an ex-cop with a vigilante attitude, retired from the Chester Police Department in 1997. Before his death, he was indicted for allegedly threatening to kill the city’s police chief in a city hall restroom in March, 2014. He faced up to 5 years in jail and a $5000 fine had he been convicted.

When his wife called, Williams arrived and went after the gang as they rode off. During a three-mile chase, at speeds of up to 70 mph, Williams reportedly fired gunshots at the truck. It is unclear whether police found any shell casings in Williams car, or gunshot residue on his hand.

At some point during the chase, unbeknownst to Williams, Moore exited the truck (he testified that he “fell” out of the truck). When Williams drove up, Moore allegedly opened fire.

Christopher Moore
Christopher Moore

In his first interviews with investigators, Moore denied any involvement with the murder, claiming he was elsewhere at the time. In court during the trial, he admitted firing the weapon, but claimed it was in self-defense.

A jury was selected and seated for a trial which began Tuesday (April 19), but did not get to hear Moore’s testimony at Monday’s stand your ground hearing, when he said he did not intend to kill Williams.

After three days of testimony, the jury began deliberations on Friday (April 22), but could not reach a unanimous verdict by Saturday morning (April 23), resulting in a mistrial. No date was set for a retrial. If convicted, Moore faces a sentence of from 30 years to life.

Mother Shoots, Kills Daughter By Mistake, Second Incident In 2 Years

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[UPDATED December 31, 2015]

In a second tragic incident of its kind in two years, a Florida mother apparently in fear has accidentally shot and killed her daughter last night (Tuesday, December 29th) .

The Orlando Sentinel reports this latest shooting occurred just before midnight at a home in the Osceola County city of St. Cloud, when a sleeping mother, who reportedly works as a dispatcher for a local police department, was startled awake by the sound of someone entering the house. Thinking it was an intruder, she fired a single shot that struck her 27 year-old daughter, who was visiting from North Carolina and had just entered the house.

The young woman’s stepfather, identified by the Orlando Sentinel as detective Claude Campbell, a corporal with the St. Cloud police department, called 911. On audio of the emergency call, the grieving mother, identified as 45 year-old Sherry Campbell, can be heard in the background, apparently comforting her wounded daughter, who the Sentinel identified as Ashley Doby, and crying,”Baby, I love you so much, please!..please…Oh my God!.”

On the audio, the stepfather does not tell the dispatcher that the daughter had been shot. He reportedly had not yet realized what had transpired.

The young woman died at a hospital, while the mother was taken to the hospital for unspecified treatment. Citing law enforcement policy, police did not initially release the names of those involved because it occurred at a home of someone who works in law enforcement.

Police said evidence so far indicates the shooting appears to have been accidental. No charges have been filed as of the time of this post and an investigation is still taking place, but police say the State Attorney’s office will review the case.

Accidental shootings like this one underscore the caution that should be taken when a weapon is in a household. All residents and visitors should be made aware – especially during holidays – when someone may be visiting, that a weapon is in a home, and to always communicate before entering a home at night.

In an eerily similar shooting on November 25th, 2013, Adele Bing, 52, of Winter Haven Florida, mistakenly shot and killed her 25 year-old daughter, Ruby Bing, who was holding Adele’s 4-month-old grandchild. Adele’s boyfriend had just left after an argument, and when Ruby showed up unannounced, Adele answered the door with a gun in her hand, firing the shot that killed her daughter. The baby was unharmed.

Ruby Bing2
Ruby Bing

In another case of self-defense gone wrong, one month later in Colorado Springs, Colorado on December 23rd, 2013, 14 year-old Kiana O’Neil was accidentally killed by her stepfather, an Iraq war veteran, as she sneaked into her home through a basement window.

Kiana O'neil
Kiana O’Neil

Neither of these cases should be construed as a “stand your ground” incident. However, each would fall under a state’s self defense laws, or “castle doctrine“, which dictates that a person has a right to defend himself and family against great bodily harm or death in the home, if a person fears an imminent threat – even if by deadly force.

This article will be updated with more information as it becomes available.

Check out the self-defense laws in your state

 

Why Santa Should Bypass Stand Your Ground States

For his own safety, Santa Claus might want to bypass and avoid some places in America. Soaring through the Christmas skies won’t be a problem for the guy in red, because NORAD is tracking and protecting him from airborne missiles and ground-to-air fire. He’ll be OK.

Once landing on rooftops, hopefully Santa’s sleigh is as silent as the night. Chimneys might be too hot in winter temperatures, and that’s when it could really get dangerous, but not because of a fireplace. The heat could come from gunfire.

If someone hears sounds on their roof, they could just shoot first, and ask questions later. Or, if a person in that house feels threatened by Santa or an elf, and is afraid of bodily harm, they could have that red and white outfit soaked in Santa’s blood.
Santa and stand your ground

One very tragic incident occurred two years ago, two days before Christmas Day, when 14 year-old Kiana O’Neil was accidentally killed by her stepfather, an Iraq war veteran, as she sneaked into her home in Colorado.

What many gun-owning homeowners may not realize is the difference between stand your ground law and “castle doctrine”, sometimes called castle laws. Under castle doctrine, you do not need a “stand your ground” law to defend yourself in your home. Yet, some folks may not have ever heard of the castle doctrine, and erroneously think that stand your ground law gives them special constitutional rights they didn’t already have, and that repealing stand your ground law would take away those rights.

Based on England’s 17th century doctrine that a man’s home is his castle the doctrine has been in place for hundreds of years. (in some states, a vehicle is also an extension of the castle). In the castle, or anyplace a person owns or rents and has a legal right to be, under castle law, that person also has a right to defend himself and family against great bodily harm or death, if a person fears an imminent threat – even if by deadly force.

Some states apply castle doctrine if the occupants reasonably believe the intruder intends to commit a felony such as arson or burglary. The occupant must not have provoked or instigated the intrusion nor an intruder’s threat or use of deadly force. And some states still include a “duty to retreat” clause (which means to seek safety and call – or try to call – the police first) in their self-defense laws.

SEE: Does Your State Have A Stand Your Ground Law?

In every state, the occupant(s) must have a legal right to be there, cannot be fugitive(s) or aiding/abetting other fugitives from the law, and the law can’t be used against a law enforcement officer performing his duty. In some states, the occupant must not be engaged in any unlawful activity during the encroachment, and, in most cases, the castle doctrine gives immunity from civil charges also.

Stand your ground laws change the castle doctrine by relieving a “duty to retreat” inherent in castle doctrine, and applying it to anywhere a person has a right to be. More than half of all American states have some variation of these two, distinct laws.

Stand Your Ground Frees Black Woman Charged In Killing White Man In Road Rage Incident

 

In what her attorney called a “perfect stand your ground case” an African-American Texas woman has been cleared in the shooting death of a white man who she claimed was a threat during a 2012 Harris County road rage incident. Crystal Scott, of Houston, had been charged with murder in the death of Jonathan Ables. Prosecutors dismissed the charge on Monday, June 29, 2015. The case drew widespread attention because of its racial undertones.

Crystal Scott
Crystal Scott

Scott was 23 years-old when she and 22 year-old Ables were involved in a minor morning rush hour traffic accident as they were each were driving to work on September 17, 2012. She reported they had cut each other off while driving, with Ables at one point even getting in front of her and slamming on his brakes as they hop-scotched on the highway.

When they both pulled over into a service station, after Ables had reportedly bumped her car, Scott and several witnesses said Ables got out of his pickup truck, approached her vehicle in a rage, then started cursing and banging on her car window while pulling on her car door. She was not injured, but said she feared for her life when she fired through her car window. Ables reportedly suffered two gunshot wounds in the upper torso.

Jonathan Ables
Jonathan Ables

Scott said she was acting in self-defense when she fired at Ables through her closed car window as he raged at her and tried to open her car door. Scott, who holds a concealed carry permit, was questioned for several hours and released without being arrested.

Ables’ family was furious, claiming he had his hands up and was backing away when Scott fired on him. His parents said he had no reason to harm Scott. It was only after his family called for justice that a grand jury indicted Scott on a murder charge – five months later – in February, 2013. And that’s when Scott’s family and supporters became angry. She surrendered, and was released on a $50,000 bond.

Now that the case is over, Scott’s attorney, Letitia Quinones said, “It’s a perfect ‘stand your ground’ case”. However, Ables’ family is angry again, feeling that justice has not been served.

Texas is a stand your ground state, requiring no duty to retreat from a threat before using deadly force. Self-defense “castle doctrine” laws in most American states include and extend to a person’s vehicle, therefore there was never a need for Scott to invoke stand your ground.

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New Orleans Homeowner Arrested For Shooting Burglar

New Orleans police arrested a 39 year-old New Orleans homeowner for aggravated battery on June 30, accusing him of shooting a man suspected of burglarizing a house the homeowner had under repair.

According to the Times-Picayune, the homeowner, Luiz Delmia, and his wife, were driving by a building that was being repaired due to a fire, when they saw an unidentified man enter the house. Delmia parked, got out of his car, went to the house, and encountered an unidentified man. Delmia allegedly shot the man several times, then stood over him and threatened to shoot again.

Luiz Delmia
Luiz Delmia

One witness reportedly said he heard nine shots, then two more, and heard the suspected burglar begging for his life, saying “Please don’t shoot me again”, and that witness told the New Orleans Advocate that Delmia kicked the wounded man as he lay on the ground. The witness said after Delmia emptied one clip of his gun, he asked his wife for another.

It’s not clear whether the shooting occurred inside or outside the house. Delmia’s wife told police that the house had been burglarized for copper pipe and wiring three times in the past week.

Louisiana is a “stand your ground” state. The state’s stand your ground law (La. Rev. Stat. 14:20) reads, “A person who is not engaged in unlawful activity and who is in a place where he or she has a right to be shall have no duty to retreat before using deadly force as provided for in this Section, and may stand his or her ground and meet force with force”.

Louisiana self defense laws (La. Rev. Stat. 14:19) state, “Use of force which does not result in death is justifiable when committed to prevent forcible offense against the person; or forcible offense or trespass against property in a person’s lawful possession”.

Homeowners should always know the law before taking action pertaining to protection of property. Check out the stand your ground laws in your state.

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Ex-Prison Guard Not Charged In Shocking Chase, Killing In New York Subway [Video]

Where is the line separating self-defense from vigilantism?

New York is not a “stand your ground” state, meaning that a person has a duty to retreat from a threat if possible, before using deadly force. But this story proves you can still chase after and kill an unarmed person in a crowded subway station and get away with it, in a public shooting that is shocking, even by New York standards.

On Tuesday, March 10, 2015 electricians Gilbert Drogheo, 32 and Joscelyn Evering, 28, were headed home from work, strapping on a crowded subway to Brooklyn. As 69 year-old Willie Groomes, an ex-prison guard (who retired in 1993) with a gun permit, tried to walk between the pair to get on the subway, one of the younger men addressed him with the slang, “my nigger,” according to reports. Groomes replied, “I’m not your nigger.”

“They (Drogheo and Evering) were talking mad trash,” a witness reportedly said. “They must have been drunk.” Other witnesses said Drogheo raised his fist, threatening to “smoke” Groomes before Evering jumped Groomes (something Evering denied). Groomes pulled out a .380 Ruger handgun to try to fight him off. At least one witness reportedly saw Drogheo push Groomes back into the train as the two friends exited to get away. Neither Drogheo nor Evering is reported to have been armed.

Gilbert Drogheo
Gilbert Drogheo, 28, was shot and killed in a New York subway station on March 10, 2015

Groomes went after Drogheo, later claiming he wanted to make a “citizens’ arrest”. A three minute witness’ cellphone video shows the ensuing confrontation. Groomes is first seen on the video in the station, apparently after exiting the subway, walking swiftly down stairs, toward someone who is shouting at him on the lower stairs, and, as Groomes advances, he can be heard saying “Where you gonna go” to the younger man, who runs when Groomes gets to bottom of the stairs.

During the encounter, someone can be heard shouting repeatedly, “Don’t shoot him, O.G., don’t shoot him”. Groomes stops, looks up, turns, and heads back up the stairs, where, 25 seconds into the video, Groomes goes at Drogheo landing a left fist to the temple and holding a gun in the right hand. Drogheo reels from the blow, then struggles with Groomes over the gun before being shot. Witnesses scramble and a man who appears to be Evering approaches the wounded Drogheo, kneeling over and calling out mournfully to him as police arrive. Evering is arrested. Drogheo died later that evening at a hospital.

On May 4th, Brooklyn District Ken Thompson announced there wasn’t enough evidence to prove a crime was committed.

Thompson issued a statement that read, “Following a full and fair investigation…I have determined that criminal charges are not warranted in this matter. Based on interviews of multiple eyewitnesses to the events leading up to the shooting, our review of video tapes of the shooting itself and other evidence, I have decided not to put this case into the grand jury and will not bring criminal charges against Mr. Groomes. While the death of this young man was indeed tragic, we cannot prove any charge of homicide beyond a reasonable doubt.”

Prosecutors claim a second video shows that Groomes had given up trying to track down Drogheo, but they ran into each other again, when they claim Drogheo initiated a struggle that resulted in an “accidental discharge” of the weapon. This shocking cellphone video below seems to contradict that contention.

New York state self-defense laws allow a citizen to use physical force, “other than deadly physical force” when “he or she reasonably believes such to be necessary to effect an arrest or to prevent the escape from custody of a person” who may have committed a crime. A citizen can use deadly physical force only when defending against “imminent use of deadly physical force,” or when it is necessary to detain a person who was committed manslaughter, murder, robbery, forcible rape, or forcible criminal sexual act.

Gregg Pinto, a former Brooklyn assistant district attorney, told Gawker the reason Groomes was not arrested has little to do with self-defense or anything else about the conflict itself. “I can’t imagine that if this guy didn’t have a badge, he wouldn’t have been arrested,” Pinto. “In my opinion, NYPD is arrest first, ask questions later. The only time you don’t arrest is if the person is somehow connected to the police.”

In 1984, New Yorker Bernie Goetz made national headlines when he shot four black teenagers who were trying to mug him. He was arrested but later acquitted of attempted murder.

No one disputes the fact that Drogheo and his friend initiated the confrontation. Yet Groomes could have simply called the cops, or not followed the two younger men. He has not been charged or arrested. Evering was arrested at the scene, charged with menacing and felony assault. Drogheo’s family wants and deserves justice and have started a petition to get District Attorney Ken Thompson to charge Groomes with murder.

Was Groomes justified? What do you think he should have done? Leave your comments.

What’s your opinion of stand your ground law?

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Pooping By Dog Leads To Father’s Day Shooting

A Miami man, upset over a dog trying to poop on his son’s lawn, told police he shot the dog owner on Father’s Day because he felt threatened.

UPDATE: Knife found at scene contained no DNA from the victim

66-year-old Omar Rodriguez had a verbal altercation with Jose “Pepe” Rey, and Rodriguez claimed Rey had said he would return. Later, it’s reported that, as Rey was talking with other neighbors at a gathering, Rodriguez appeared. Rodriguez told police he saw Rey move toward him, with some type of “shiny object” in his hand, so he went to his car, got his gun, then opened fire, shooting Rey multiple times. He also threatened to shoot Rey’s wife, Lissy, when she ran to help her husband.

Jose "Pepe" Rey
Jose “Pepe” Rey was shot multiple times during a dispute over a dog trying to poop

Rey is last reported to be in critical condition, with severe abdominal and spinal injuries. A GoFundMe account has been set up to help the Rey family with medical expenses.

Rodriguez was arrested and faces charges of second-degree attempted murder and aggravated assault. At his arraignment on June 23, a judge denied bond, citing police reports that state Rey had his hands out and was backing up when he was shot.

Omar Rodriguez
Omar Rodriguez appears for arraignment June 23, 2015

Neighbors of Rodriguez’ son and his own neighbors – miles away – all reportedly described Rodriguez as unstable, saying he has allegedly threatened people in his son’s neighborhood as well as his own. Several frightened people in his son’s neighborhood have reportedly filed restraining orders to keep him away, and police have released surveillance camera footage that shows Rodriguez engaged in some mischief and altercations involving neighbors.

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This Rapper Shot A Police Officer. Will ‘Stand Your Ground’ Set Him Free?

Fusion

About an hour before dawn on a February morning this year, Elton Bandoo was asleep in his room when he was suddenly awoken by a loud bang and the sound of the windows of his North Miami Beach home being shattered. “I think we’re being robbed!” his mother shouted from the next room.

Startled, Bandoo says he jumped out of bed, grabbed one of his pistols, and ran to the back of the house, where the sounds seemed to come from. Outside, he would later tell police, he spotted a man climbing over his wooden fence in the darkness. Bandoo fired, hitting the man twice: once in the leg, and once in the arm.

That man turned out to be Lino Diaz, 47, a 18-year veteran of the North Miami Beach Police Department. Officers had surrounded the home to serve a federal search warrant related to an unemployment fraud investigation.

Diaz was…

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In Memory Of Trayvon Martin Feb 5, 1995 – Feb 26, 2012

In Memory Of Trayvon Martin (Feb 5, 1995 – Feb 26, 2012), a video by Diego Rodriguz found on YouTube, with a montage of sometimes familiar, touching photos of Trayvon Martin, offers a poignant memorial to the African-American teenager whose death on February 26, 2012 opened widespread, heated debate on race and gun rights in America.

As his killer continues to be a free man, we do hope Trayvon may rest in peace, yet that may not happen until the battle is won to change or repeal stand your ground laws.

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